Health & Beauty

$4.7 million boosts UCSD-Led Malaria Research Program

Supplemental $4.7 million will aid drug development to accelerate disease eradication

An international research team, led by principal investigator Elizabeth A. Winzeler, PhD, professor in the pediatric division of host-microbe systems and therapeutics at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, and colleagues have received a three-year, $4.7 million supplemental grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to advance their development of improved therapies for malaria eradication and elimination….

This year’s flu has killed more people in years past

  By José A. Álvarez, County of San Diego Communications Office   The weekly total of local influenza cases reached a new high this season, the County Health and Human Services Agency announced today. A total of 555 cases were reported last week, surpassing the 474 cases reported the week ending Jan. 7, 2017. Also, five flu deaths were reported,…

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterial scourge. As its name suggests, MRSA is resistant to most common antibiotics and thus difficult to treat, particularly in children where it commonly causes complicated skin and skin structure infections. In a randomized, controlled clinical trial — the first of its kind — a multi-institution research team reports that daptomycin, part of a…

Stop mosquito bites with soap, chairs and clothing

(CNN) – Known to health experts as the most deadly animal on the planet, the minuscule mosquito, with its dreaded whine, is responsible for millions of deaths from multiple diseases each year. In 2015, more than 210 million people had malaria, with an estimated 429,000 dying from the disease. That same year, more than 1.4 million people were thought to have…

SDSU researchers develop a device to restore motion in damaged spinal chords

Newly developed “glassy carbon” electrodes transmit more robust signals to restore motion in people with damaged spinal cords.

SAN DIEGO, Calif. (Feb. 16, 2017) — When people suffer spinal cord injuries and lose mobility in their limbs, it’s a neural signal processing problem. The brain can still send clear electrical impulses and the limbs can still receive them, but the signal gets lost in the damaged spinal cord. The Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering (CSNE)—a collaboration of San…